Why Uploading Your Perfect Resume Isn’t Helping Your Industry Job Search

The Unwritten Rules of the Highly Effective Job Search: Click here!

Hey there, and thanks for visiting another enhancement of Ask Cheeky. I'm Isaiah Hankel with Cheeky Scientist, as well as today we've obtained a fantastic inquiry from Mischna Sadir.

" I remain in my 3rd year of a postdoc, as well as I've been putting on jobs consistently on the internet. I have actually posted well over 100 resumes to various job posts, consisting of ones that I am really qualified for and also those that do not need market experience, even some that simply request a Master's of Scientific research degree. However I never ever get a response back besides an automatic email message. What am I doing wrong?"

This is a wonderful concern, and also one we obtain a great deal. We know a great deal of PhDs, including a few of our Associates who have spent most of their time submitting resumes to task sites, also well-crafted resumes, well crafted, 1 to 2 page market resumes with results-oriented bullet factors. They're uploading these resumes and also not hearing anything back. This is for a variety of reasons. Now to start with, a lot of employment opportunities, particularly at leading level companies like your Pfizers, your Baxters, Mercks, these big business … For every placement that they publish online, they're hopping on typical 2,000 to 3,000 resumes. Okay, so 2,000 to 3,000 job prospects, various other prospects besides you are putting on that very same position. When you see a task posting on Indeed.com or Naturejobs or the firm's internet site, thousands of other individuals are applying.

Do you think that people are reading these resumes? Naturally not. Business are not working with thousands of individuals to filter through resumes all the time. Instead they're using what is called applicant monitoring software, which reduces your entire return to as well as every little thing that you fill in and also all those little boxes online to a solitary row, that row that catches some details metrics concerning you and enable them to organize it similar to you would organize a spread sheet. What they search for … It's a variety of points, however it could be the anticipated wage that you place in. It could be particular density of key phrases, so they wish to match the keywords on your resume to the work publishing. If you don't have sufficient key words on your resume to match a work posting, you're not even going to get to the top of the list. You may not also get to the top 1,000 of all those hundreds of people that are using within that software.

It takes a look at a selection of these metrics. Only the company knows just what these metrics are. Aside from the keywords, it's actually difficult to get past that firewall software, so to speak, if you're attempting to get a market placement. If you're simply resting behind your workdesk in the lab and uploading resumes, even if you're a best suitable for the task, the probability that you're mosting likely to be seen by an actual hiring supervisor or recruiter is slim to none.

Below's another thing that makes matters also worse, is that the majority of placements, once they're published online, they're currently filled up. A lot of large firms, particularly public companies, they need to publish a position online for a certain variety of weeks or even a couple of months legally prior to they fill the setting. Even if they have it loaded internally, before they can accept the job being filled up, they have to post it online. They could already have someone worked with inside or via an employer or with recommendation. You see the work online and think that it's still open, yet it's not. It's already loaded. Smaller business, specifically start-ups, firms that are going quickly, they don't upload their tasks online. They'll count entirely on references.

We have a lot of statistics on our website that show you that 50 to 60 percent of all tasks at leading companies are filled up with references. What are references? It's when you know someone that works at a company. They find out about a task position that's open. Allow's say you fulfill them at a networking occasion. You inform them you want the job. They inform your company that you 'd be a great fit for the job, and also because of this, you go ahead of everybody else, all those countless people that have actually used. You leap right into the meeting, obtaining screened, possibly your initial few meeting display calls, and after that getting talked to for the position. It happens promptly.

If you take a look at these statistics, you'll see that many works now come via referrals. Yet only 7 percent of candidates on average are using through recommendations. 93 percent are simply posting resumes, which are going through the candidate monitoring software program, and also essentially in the garbage.

Why Uploading Your Perfect Resume Isn't Helping Your Industry Job Search

Hello, and welcome to another addition of Ask Cheeky. I'm Isaiah Hankel with Cheeky Scientist, and today we've got a great question from Mischna Sadir.

"I'm in my third year of a postdoc, and I've been applying to jobs regularly online. I've uploaded well over 100 resumes to different job postings, including ones that I am very qualified for and those that do not require industry experience, even some that just ask for a Master's of Science degree. But I never get a response back other than an automated email message. What am I doing wrong?"

This is a great question, and one we get a lot. We know a lot of PhDs, including some of our Associates who have spent most of their time uploading resumes to job sites, even well-crafted resumes, well crafted, 1 to 2 page industry resumes with results-oriented bullet points. They're uploading these resumes and not hearing anything back. This is for a variety of reasons. Now first of all, most open positions, especially at top level companies like your Pfizers, your Baxters, Mercks, these large companies ... For every position that they post online, they're getting on average 2,000 to 3,000 resumes. Okay, so 2,000 to 3,000 job candidates, other candidates besides you are applying to that same position. When you see a job posting on Indeed.com or Naturejobs or the company's website, thousands of other people are applying.

Do you think that human beings are reading these resumes? Of course not. Companies are not hiring hundreds of people to sift through resumes all day. Instead they're using what is called applicant tracking software, which reduces your entire resume and everything that you fill in and all those little boxes online down to a single row, that row that captures some specific metrics about you and allow them to organize it just like you would organize a spreadsheet. What they look for ... It's a variety of things, but it could be the expected salary that you put in. It could be certain density of keywords, so they want to match the keywords on your resume to the job posting. If you don't have enough keywords on your resume to match a job posting, you're not even going to get to the top of the list. You might not even get to the top 1,000 of all those thousands of people that are applying within that software.

It looks at a variety of these metrics. Only the employer knows what these metrics are. Other than the keywords, it's really hard to get past that firewall, so to speak, if you're trying to get an industry position. If you're just sitting behind your desk in the lab and uploading resumes, even if you're a perfect fit for the job, the likelihood that you're going to be seen by an actual hiring manager or recruiter is slim to none.

Here's something else that makes matters even worse, is that most positions, once they're posted online, they're already filled. A lot of big companies, especially public companies, they have to post a position online for a certain number of weeks or even a couple of months legally before they fill the position. Even if they have it filled internally, before they can sign off on the job being filled, they have to post it online. They could already have somebody hired internally or through a recruiter or through referral. You see the job online and think that it's still open, but it's not. It's already filled. Smaller companies, especially startups, companies that are going quickly, they don't post their jobs online. They'll rely completely on referrals.

We have a lot of statistics on our website that show you that 50 to 60 percent of all jobs at top firms are filled through referrals. What are referrals? It's when you know somebody that works at a company. They know about a job position that's open. Let's say you meet them at a networking event. You tell them you're interested in the job. They tell your employer that you'd be a good fit for the job, and as a result, you go ahead of everybody else, all those thousands of people that have applied. You jump right into the interview, getting screened, probably your first couple of interview screen calls, and then getting interviewed for the position. It happens quickly.

If you look at these statistics, you'll see that most jobs now come through referrals. Yet only 7 percent of applicants on average are applying through referrals. 93 percent are just uploading resumes, which are going through the applicant tracking software, and essentially in the trash.